Mirror Wars - Reflection One

Reviews

 

 

 

In two words: big ambition. They are very proud of their real life special effects as there is almost no CGI, the flights, the explosions, all real. The script has more holes than Swiss cheese. It's not really, really bad, but would benefit from rewriting. MM is sort of a James Bond gone bad, too cool for words. The character is underwritten, but he brings a sort of a cynical charm to his part and is very believable. The script also lacks a clearly defined hero, there are too many characters and little time to root for them. Murdock turns out to have quite a lot of screen time and some of the best lines in the film. Armand Assante is pretty good, but he has very little to do beside pace back and forth, look worried, and say lines like "We've got to catch him", "I will get him", "The secret service will get him." Rutger Hauer is there for five minutes tops. He's cool but his part is smaller than MM's part was in Mr. Magoo.
The other characters: four young pilots (with very little differences in character and most killed off in the first quarter), the avia constructor who is a total bore, two special agents from the Russian analog of FBI who try too hard to be tough and witty a-la Die Hard (one of them is played by the producer, who also co-wrote the script.) A young American romantic heroine, played skillessly by a local starlette. The characters are lifeless, consumed by the plot, which is about the airplane, and MM, villain or not, has perhaps the most interesting part. He gets to do a little action, a little of the spy thing, a dramatic talk of his backstory - his trademark bad guy thing. He changes costumes, locations and even has a bit of aggressive sexual tension with his unwilling partner in crime, who is what they call a 'sexy bitch' (played by the studio owner's/producer/writer/actor's wife, no less. No other movie credits to her name.)
I've read an interview in one of the film magazines, taken on the set last year, where MM said he hated weapons and I wondered if he also hates it when he has to do it on the set. I mean, running around with a gun, shooting people left and right, all that. It's not for real, of course, but if he hates the weapons themselves...anyways, the real life airplane shots left me with an ambient feeling. On one hand, in the CGI era, it's sort of cool to know the thing was really flying up there, doing the air tricks and so on. On the other hand, I can't help thinking it would have looked more impressive if it were CGI - prettier, more powerful.


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If there was ever an instance where Amazon needed to seriously consider allowing a product to be given a negative rating, this is it.

This abomination of a movie was produced, written, and directed by a Russian crew, but watching it, it felt more like it was created by a truckload of lobotomized monkeys. Russia - the culture that gave us Dostoevsky, Peter the Great, and Nabokov. It boggles the mind that something like Mirror Wars could originate in the same gene pool. But... coming from country that's given the world both Mark Twain and Jerry Springer, I guess I don't have room to talk.

At any rate, this was an atrocious movie. Absolutely horrible. The plot, as far as I could tell, revolved around a terrorist (played by Malcolm McDowell, in what is surely some sort of career death-wish) who decides to steal a new Russian stealth jet-fighter prototype so he can use it to assassinate the US President. What this guy's motivation was, I really couldn't tell you. Perhaps it was lost somewhere in the really bad over-dubbing.

Also mixed into the plot is the naive young pilot of the stealth jet, who falls madly in love with an American ecologist in Russia to save the Siberian tiger population. (Huh?)

Throw in a little Armand Assante as some sort of CIA operative who may or may not have been involved in trying to prevent the terrorist plot (again, the story line was a bit... shall we say... vague), and a mystifying 40-second cameo by Rutger Hauer, and you have pure movie magic.

Unless you're some sort of sick celluloid masochist, avoid this at all costs.
 

By J. R Weaver "Batboy" (SF, CA, USA) (Amazon.com)

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I was waiting for this movie for a long time. After all, it's the first Russian movie with Rutger Hauer, my favourite actor. According the first news about "Mirror Wars: Reflection One" - it will be screen version of "Labyrinth of Reflections" - the novel by Sergey Lukyanenko, the author of the "NightWatch" trilogy. However, fortunately, those rumors was fake ("Labyrinth of Reflections" or "Glubina" will be filming in the next year, double fortunately, without Rutger) - "Mirror Wars: Reflection One" - spy action movie about Russian air forces and new interceptor "Sabretooth". Some terrorist organization which wants to get hold it, so Mysterious Man (Hauer) gave order to Dick Murdock (McDowell) - ex-CIA agent, who became a first class terrorist after being captured in China - to provoke conflict between USA and Russia with "Sabretooth". However, Alexei Kedrov (Efimov) - the brave pilot of "Sabretooth" don't want to give the interceptor to the bad guys.

The whole film isn't bad (there is some good action scenes on the earth and in the air), but sometime it's a slightly inconsistently and boring. Seems, all movie budget was spent for action scenes, plane crashings (very effective - without CG!) and three foreign actors. As about Russian actors - for many of them "Mirror Wars: Reflection One" was their first movie. Their performance is rather boring and unnatural - in contrast to their foreign colleagues. McDowell is great villain, Assante - in good traditions of his old movies, Hauer - mysterious charismatic old man. So... 5 out of 10, I think.

Author: gerant-1 from Russian Federation

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0337678/#comment